Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry

Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry

10 See A. del Ninno, Online Gambling in the European Union: A. Compared Analysis of the Current Legal Framework in Some EU. Member States, GAMING LAW REVIEW. To view this article in a different language, use the language dropdown at the Examples: Online casinos or bookmakers, bingo or slots sites or apps. Regular gamblers were more than six times more likely to gamble online compared to before the COVID pandemic, according to new research. Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry

You can watch a thematic video

Biggest gambling news - Online gambling 2022

Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry - have

French casinos vs. Française des Jeux : the war for online gambling is declared

Publié le 17/04/ par Thibault Verbiest, Evelyn Heffermehl- vues

A fierce competition The Syndicat des Casinos Modernes, one of the main bodies representing the interest of the casino sector in France has recently lodged a complaint to the European Commission’s Directorate General for Competition against the French State and the Française des Jeux, on grounds of abuse of a dominant position (article 86 of…

A fierce competition

The Syndicat des Casinos Modernes, one of the main bodies representing the interest of the casino sector in France has recently lodged a complaint to the European Commission’s Directorate General for Competition against the French State and the Française des Jeux, on grounds of abuse of a dominant position (article 86 of the EC Treaty read in conjunction with article 82).

The French casino sector has been facing fierce competition for the recent past years from the local monopoly, the Française des Jeux, which, since , has been solely authorized to offer online gambling services in France by virtue of its own internal rules and under authorization of the French State.

The French monopoly has been expanding its offer ever more, providing online casino-like games &#; with names such as “black jack” and “roulette”- in violation of the European Court of Justice requirement of “consistent gaming policy “ set out in the famous Gambelli ruling.

The French casino sector has been unsuccessfully lobbying the French authorities for years in order to obtain the right to offer its services on the internet, as its European and national counterparts are allowed to do.

The French casino legislation is indeed outdated and unfit for today’s virtual industry as it partly dates back to the beginning of the twentieth century.

Many serious studies have shown that the French casino industry’s growth has been slowing down compared to the growth registered by the Française des Jeux and by the online casino industry.

Recently, the French Prime Minister has been asked by the Syndicat des Casinos Modernes to annul national provisions granting the exclusive right to offer gambling services to the Française des Jeux.

A refusal by the French government could trigger a parallel national judicial action in front of the highest administrative court, the Conseil d’Etat, which is not unlikely to give right to the casino sector: in May the High Court had already expressed its concerns over the ever expanding offer of the Française des Jeux , by referring to the European Court of Justice case-law.

Six years after, with the Française des Jeux now holding an online exclusivity, the High Court should be showing even more concern than back then…

The legal basis

Article 86 of the EC Treaty prohibits Member States, in the case of public undertakings and undertakings to which Member States grant special or exclusive rights, to enact or maintain in force any measures contrary to the rules contained in the Treaty, in particular to those rules provided for in article 12 and articles 81 to 89.

The Française des Jeux, as a public undertaking in a monopoly situation (the French State holds a 72 % share in the company), undisputedly enjoys a dominant position on the offline lottery and sports betting market.

This allows it to abuse its dominant position on another market: the emerging and booming online gambling market, which encompasses all that the gambling industry can offer: lotteries, betting, casino games and much more.

The abuse consists of:

  1. the extension of the monopoly’s dominant position to the online market, under permission of the French authorities;
  2. the subsequent discrimination operated between casino operators established in the European Union and the Française des Jeux, despite the fact that they are both situated on the same market: the online gambling market
  3. eliminating or weakening competition on a neighboring market: the online gambling market;

Commission decisions and European Court of Justice case-law prohibit a firm enjoying a dominant position to discriminate in favor of its own activities on a neighboring market.

Moreover, other secondary law instruments, such as the Directive on competition in the markets for electronic communications networks and services provide that,

Member States shall take all measures necessary to ensure that any undertaking is entitled to provide electronic communications services or to establish, extend or provide electronic communications networks.

As the European Court of Justice has decided, Member States have a duty, under article 10 of the EC Treaty, to ensure the fulfillment of the obligations arising out of the Treaty and no to take any measures which could jeopardize the attainment of the objectives contained therein.

One of these objectives, stated in article 3 (g), is to ensure that competition in the internal market is not distorted.

The Commission has thus been asked by the Syndicat des Casinos Modernes to address all appropriate measures:

  1. On the one hand, to the French State, which grants the monopoly to the FDJ through legislation (article 17 of a Act);
  2. On the other hand to the FDJ, so that it puts an end to its abusive conduct by amending its internal rules.

The impact of the internet on market (re)definition: the gambling example

Traditionally, casino games and other games such as lotteries and betting &#; which are offered exclusively in France by the Française des Jeux &#; belong to different markets.

The French competition authority considers, on the basis of supply side substitution, that casino games, lotteries and sports betting are not interchangeable: for example, traditional lottery games are available throughout the French territory, whereas casino games are restricted to certain (thermal) regions.

The distinction between casinos and games offered by the Française des Jeux therefore rests on a geographical criteria which no longer makes sense when applied to the internet: its de facto cross-border character prevents it in its very nature to be restricted geographically since all games are now available through the same channel of distribution.

This explains why Community law and jurisprudence do not distinguish between different types of gambling services, but refer to “gambling activities which involve wagering a stake with pecuniary value” (eg, Commission proposal for a directive on services in the internal market, e-commerce directive, Schindler, Zenatti, Gambelli rulings of the European Court of Justice).

A French Senate report from (the Trucy report) has pointed out that the evolution of the gambling sector is characterized by a certain number of convergences linked to an increasing competition and the use of modern technologies.

Indeed, online gambling operators converge ever more towards a “one-stop-shop”, to quote the expression used in a comprehensive study conducted by the Deutsch Bank on the online gambling industry: to put it simply, today, online bookmakers offer classical sports betting services as well as casino games (and more).

This fact is even confirmed by the European Lotteries Association, which represents all the national lotteries in Europe.

When considering the demand- side substitution – which is the traditional criteria used by the European Commission for the sake of market definition &#; , it is striking to see that players now have access on the Française des Jeux website, to games ranging from lotteries to casino games, switching easily from one to another.

Other factors such as online payment and registering, games rules and names, visual presentation, wagers, profit, element of chance all point out to the fact that the games offered online are interchangeable in the eyes of the consumer. If players are wagering smaller amounts of money than offline, the addiction risks are the same whether playing a Française des Jeux lottery or a Casino-on-net game.

What next?

It is high time for the French authorities to acknowledge that the situation faced today by casino operators confronted to the French market is one that distorts competition and harms the achievement of the internal market.

This acknowledgment would be best shown by abrogating the relevant provisions of the Act which grants a monopoly to the Française des Jeux and/or by amending its internal rules whereby it is exclusively allowed to offer online gambling services to French citizens.

Alternatively, the French government should allow an online casino licensing regime available to all “fit and proper” operators.

If both the French State and the Française des Jeux fail to act, the European Commission would fully play its role of guardian of the Treaty by investigating the complaint lodged by the Syndicat des Casinos Modernes.

Droit & Technologies
Источник: [casinobet77.asia]

Background: Concerns that Internet gambling has elevated the prevalence of problem gambling have not been substantiated; however, evidence suggests a subgroup of Internet gamblers do experience higher rates of gambling harms. Greater overall involvement in gambling appears to be predictive of harms. The purpose of this study was to examine differences between Internet gamblers with a single or multiple online gambling accounts, including their gambling behaviours, factors influencing their online gambling and risk of experiencing gambling problems. Methods: Internet gamblers () responding to an online survey that assessed their gambling behaviour, and use of single or multiple online gambling accounts. Results: Results revealed that multiple account holders were more involved gamblers, gambling on more activities and more frequently, and had higher rates of gambling problems than single account holders. Multiple account holders selected gambling sites based on price, betting options, payout rates and game experience, whereas single account holders prioritized legality and consumer protection features. Conclusion: Results suggest two different types of Internet gamblers: one motivated to move between sites to optimize preferred experiences with a tendency to gamble in a more volatile manner; and a smaller, but more stable group less influenced by promotions and experiences, and seeking a reputable and safe gambling experience. As the majority of Internet gamblers use multiple accounts, more universal responsible gambling strategies are needed to assist gamblers to track and control their expenditure to reduce risks of harm.

Introduction

Gambling opportunities have expanded worldwide particularly with the availability of Internet gambling. This has led to concerns that the easy accessibility of gambling will contribute to and elevate the prevalence of problem gambling. These concerns have partially been addressed by evidence that communities adapt to gambling, with problem gambling prevalence remaining relatively stable worldwide.1, 2 However, there is some evidence that problem gambling is more common among online gamblers.3 As problem gambling is associated with poor psychosocial health, 4 understanding risk factors is important to inform harm minimization policies. This study investigates whether more involved and diverse use of Internet gambling as characterized by multiple gambling accounts is associated with an increased risk of gambling problems. This is important as several studies examining the risk of online gambling are based on users of a single site,57 and many harm minimization measures, such as spending limits, are designed only for use on a single site.

Internet gambling is increasing globally, for example, 15% of UK adults reported gambling online in , compared with 3% in 8, 9 Similarly, 8% of Australians reported gambling online in , compared with an estimated 1% in 10 One stated benefit of legalized Internet gambling is greater market competition, allowing consumers greater choice in selecting preferred websites to gamble.11 This competitive environment allows customers to easily shift between websites.12

Numerous studies have demonstrated the tendency for online gamblers to use multiple accounts, including unregulated offshore sites.3,1316 Surveys of Australian Internet wagering site users found that one-half to one-third of respondents reported visiting only one website and these respondents appeared to be less broadly and less frequently involved in online gambling compared with multiple account holders (MAHs).16 A study of 10 Internet casino and poker players found that 75–85% of respondents gambled on multiple sites. Poker players were more likely to play on only one to two sites as compared with casino players,13 suggesting that specific subgroups of gamblers are more likely to hold multiple accounts.

Internet gambling itself is not a risk factor for experiencing problems, but greater overall involvement and engagement with gambling, including greater expenditure and gambling on multiple forms, has been found to be predictive of gambling problems.1720 Using multiple forms and modes to gamble is not unique to Internet problem gamblers, for instance, problem gamblers report frequenting multiple gambling venues more often than at-risk or non-problem gamblers.21 A study of Internet gamblers found that a greater proportion of problem gamblers reported that they were influenced by incentives provided by online gambling sites as compared with non-problem gamblers.22 Conversely, professional gamblers may be more likely to hold multiple gambling accounts, to increase their ability to seek favourable returns.

This study aimed to compare gamblers with a single Internet gambling account (single account holders; SAHs) to those with multiple accounts (MAHs) in terms of their demographic characteristics, gambling, factors that influence their gambling, and risk of harm. The objective was to determine whether MAHs are more likely to be at-risk of gambling problems than SAHs to enable implications to be drawn regarding the appropriate provision of consumer protection strategies. Understanding behavioural markers that are associated with gambling problems can enable early interventions that may reduce gambling-related harms.

Methods

Participants

Respondents were recruited through advertisements on various websites, including legal Australian online wagering and lottery sites (%), Facebook (%), and Google (%). Of the survey respondents, (%) indicated that they gambled online and were included in the subsequent analyses.

Instrument and measures

Respondents completed an online survey. The completion rate was % and the mean completion time was min. The survey was designed based on a previous study on Internet gambling (N = ) and questions were refined based on these results.23 For the purpose of this study, data from specific sections of the survey were used in analyses and information about these sections is presented here (Results from the dataset on which the current study is based were published in a report submitted to the funding body.24

Demographics

Respondents were asked about general demographic information including gender, age, location of residence, country of birth and language spoken at home.

Gambling participation

Respondents were asked whether and how frequently they took part in 10 forms of gambling (including online and offline participation; see table 1).

Table 1

Number and percentage of respondents who reported taking part in each form of activity online within the last 12 months by number of sites with which respondents have Internet gambling accounts

Form of gambling . Single account
Multiple accounts
P
N% . N% . 
Instant scratch tickets 12  39  
Lottery lotto pools tickets     
Sports betting   1,  
Horse or dog race betting   1,  
Bingo  34  
Keno 12  29   
Poker 86    
Casino table games 36    
Betting on games of skill 32  61   
Electronic gaming machines 46    
Form of gambling . Single account
Multiple accounts
P
N% . N% . 
Instant scratch tickets 12  39  
Lottery lotto pools tickets     
Sports betting   1,  
Horse or dog race betting   1,  
Bingo  34  
Keno 12  29   
Poker 86    
Casino table games 36    
Betting on games of skill 32  61   
Electronic gaming machines 46    

Open in new tab

Table 1

Number and percentage of respondents who reported taking part in each form of activity online within the last 12 months by number of sites with which respondents have Internet gambling accounts

Form of gambling . Single account
Multiple accounts
P
N% . N% . 
Instant scratch tickets 12  39  
Lottery lotto pools tickets     
Sports betting   1,  
Horse or dog race betting   1,  
Bingo  34  
Keno 12  29   
Poker 86    
Casino table games 36    
Betting on games of skill 32  61   
Electronic gaming machines 46    
Form of gambling . Single account
Multiple accounts
P
N% . N% . 
Instant scratch tickets 12  39  
Lottery lotto pools tickets     
Sports betting   1,  
Horse or dog race betting   1,  
Bingo  34  
Keno 12  29   
Poker 86    
Casino table games 36    
Betting on games of skill 32  61   
Electronic gaming machines 46    

Open in new tab

Internet gambling participation

Respondents were how many separate online betting/gambling accounts they had with different operators. Respondents were asked whether they considered themselves to be a professional, semi-professional or amateur/recreational gambler to list the top three factors that influenced their decision to gamble at a specific Internet site, and the top three advantages and disadvantages of Internet over land-based gambling (from a specified list). Respondents were asked to describe the impact of using electronic payment and viewing promotions for online gambling on the amount they gambled.

Gambling related problems

Respondents completed the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI),23 a nine-item questionnaire used to classify gambling status. Each item was coded using a four-point Likert scale with a total score obtained by summing the scores for each item. Cut-off scores adhered to those used in original validation of the PGSI. The PGSI has a demonstrated test-retest reliability score of 25 Cronbach’s alpha for the PGSI in this sample was , indicating good internal consistency and stability. The Kessler 6 scale26 was used to assess the presence of non-specific psychological distress experienced over the most recent four weeks. Questions were framed to specifically relate to gambling-related psychological distress. This measure was selected for its brevity, strong psychometric properties, and ability to discriminate pathological gambling cases from non-cases in general-purpose health surveys. Cronbach’s alpha for the K6 was

Analyses

The independent variable was recoded into those who had one online account (SAHs) compared with those who had two or more (MAHs).All analyses were also run retaining the original data (number of accounts); no differences in results between the two approaches were found. Where the dependent variable was continuous, assumptions for parametric analyses were checked and independent samples t-tests were used. Where the dependent variable was ordinal, non-parametric correlations (Spearman’s rho) were used to compare the groups. For nominal dependent variables, chi-square tests of independence were employed with post hoc pairwise comparisons (Z-tests) used for all dependent variables with more than two response options. The results in table 1 were conducted using chi-square goodness of fit tests.

Categorical Principal Component Analysis was conducted on the 17 reasons that may have influenced the decision to choose one operator over another and no clear dimensions emerged. Instead, a Bonferroni correction was applied to correct for the multiple comparisons, with critical alpha for these analyses set at /17 = A multivariate binary logistic regression was run in order to determine whether the significant results from the univariate analyses were relatively independent,

Results

A total of respondents (%) indicated that they had only 1 account (SAHs), with (%) indicating 2 accounts, (%) indicating 3–4 accounts, (%) indicating 5–6 accounts and (%) indicated more than 6 accounts.

Demographic variables

Respondents mostly lived in a major metropolitan city (%) or major regional city (%). The most commonly reported marital statuses were married (%), living with a partner/de facto (%) or were never married (%). Most worked full- (%) or part-time (%) and % spoke English as their primary language at home.

MAHs were significantly more likely to be male (%) compared with SAHs (%), P < MAHs were significantly younger (M = , SD = ) than SAHs (M = , SD = ), P < Significant differences were also observed in terms of education, with MAHs significantly more likely to have a university or college degree (%) compared with SAHs (%), but significantly less likely to have a trade, technical certificate or diploma (%) compared with SAHs (%), P = No differences were observed between the groups in terms of postgraduate qualifications or other levels of education.

Gambling participation

MAHs participated (online and offline) in a significantly greater number of different forms of gambling (M = , SD = ) compared with SAHs (M = , SD = ), P < SAHs bought lottery/lotto/pools tickets significantly more frequently than MAHs (P < ). In contrast, MAHs gambled significantly more frequently than SAHs on: sports betting (P < ), horse or dog race betting (P < ), poker (P < ) and electronic gaming machines (P = ).

Table 1 illustrates the proportions of SAHs and MAHs who reported having gambled online at least once over the last 12 months, for each gambling form. With the exception of lottery/lotto/pools tickets, the majority of individuals who gambled online on all other activities were MAHs. The effect sizes (w) indicate that the effects are at least of a medium size (>

Content marketing for the digital gambling industry, bookmakers and online casinos

Why is the text so crucial for casino and gambling content?

While casinos used to be exclusive meeting places in health resorts, where wealthy heirs and Russian writers squandered their fortune at the roulette table, the tide has turned significantly in recent years. Today, online betting offices and virtual gambling halls are booming.

Accordingly, the content marketing strategy should be carefully planned. With honest content about gambling and casino games, you show responsibility, authenticity and create trust among users. You also provide information about secure payment options, your licence and, of course, lots of gaming fun. With gambling content that is perfectly tailored to the needs and requirements of your target group, you can also distinguish yourself from your competitors or dubious providers and make it easy for your site to be found by search engines through the skilful use of SEO.

cards gambling casino

Professional gambling content - the perfect strategy for your online casino

In order to be successful in the fiercely competitive market, you have to convince with top content. With interesting articles, you will not only succeed in attracting new target groups to the virtual gambling market, but also in securing the loyalty and fidelity of your registered customers in the long term.

In addition to exciting and informative texts, which are of course optimised for search engines, you can upload further elements such as graphics, pictures and videos and thus increase your visibility on the net. Position #0 on Google and Co is the goal. This total package makes your web presence at least as glamorous as the analogue look of the famous gambling establishments in Baden-Baden or Las Vegas.

Who writes the texts about gambling?

Content creation agencies like greatcontent have access to copywriters, editors and translators who find the right words for your virtual Las Vegas. Especially those linguists who like to gamble themselves are predestined to write appealing texts for the online gambling industry. The combination of SEO knowledge, passion for the written word and enthusiasm for the topic makes casino content perfectly tailored for online marketing.

International gambling content for globally successful companies

Most online casinos do not only want to establish themselves on the national market, but conquer the whole world with their online games. Accordingly, the web presence must also be internationalised. Be it the game instructions, the FAQ section or the blog - with multilingual texts you reach the communities on all continents and present yourself as the market leader in online gaming.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) and your casino texts

Sooner or later, many virtual casino operators are faced with the question of how to save money on multilingual content creation. After all, there are countless free translation programmes. However, real flesh-and-blood language experts are essential to turn a mere computer translation into a correct and appealing text. At greatcontent we have perfected this process and produce fast and scalable translations in over 30 languages. After the initial copywriting, if desired, the text goes through a CAT tool, (Computer Aided Translation), which is based on AI and delivers even better translations each time. This raw version is then revised by a post-editor and transformed into an easy to read version that is optimally adapted to your wishes. Alternatively, there are the options of classical translation, localisation or a transcreation, where your text is written exclusively for the respective target market.

What is the difference between translation and localisation?

While a translation describes the transfer of the respective gambling content into the target language, localisation is another means of optimisation. The focus here is on regional peculiarities, cultural conventions and linguistic habits. This includes certain expressions, metaphors or idioms that are considered customary in a particular context and are not amenable to direct translation into another language.

Increasing visibility with customised content for gambling and casinos

It is well known that the virtual gambling market is a highly competitive industry. To combat this, a sophisticated strategy around the content in the gambling and casino market is a real must in order to increase its visibility and attract new customers.

Whereas in the past the most important goal of a good text for casino & co was to catch customers on Google and other search engines, today the building of trust and the provision of real added value has become much more important. This is the only way to turn visitors who stumble across your website by chance into loyal customers who not only like to come back, but also recommend you to their friends.

Your own image depend decisively on the content you publish. Texts without character that have already been seen times no longer have the potential to inspire. Great posts not only manage to answer the most important questions of the target group, but also to keep users on your website for a longer period of time. And a higher time-on-site is in turn rewarded by Google with a higher ranking. Because that is proof that your content really answers the readers' questions.

How to build trust with epic gambling content

A study by the renowned Washington University in St. Louis found that the online gambling market competes for billion users each year. Given that figure, it is of course not surprising that there are some rogue traders roaming around the gambling market. In order to set yourself apart from these dodgy characters, it is not only necessary to comply with all legal requirements, but also to show customers that you work transparently, honestly and professionally.

With serious gambling and casino content you can establish yourself as a champion on the web. An exhaustive FAQ area is just as much a part of this as is responsible customer service that can be reached 24/7.

How do visitors become regular customers of online gambling?

In order to move to the Caesars Palace of the internet as quickly as possible, the first things to do is conquer the first page on Google with fantastic content on gambling and casinos. Unique texts on your casino, game instructions and payout options are a real must, because “duplicate content” is actively punished by the search engine.

When users have found a way to your website, it is important to build trust, to entice them with exciting game offers and inspire with reliable payouts and competent customer service. Loyalty programs for regular gamers, bonuses for recruiting friends or other loyalty gifts do the rest and ensure that the passionate players come back regularly.

Choose greatcontent as an experienced gambling expert!

Join the ranks of other renowned players in the virtual gambling market who have chosen greatcontent as part of their marketing strategy, including Global Gaming, LAT Media, Mercury Interactive Services GmbH and Better Collective.

Start now

Источник: [casinobet77.asia]
 Device Fingerprinting 

Online Gambling Fraud: How it Works &#; How to Stop It

Questions about online gambling fraud you were too afraid to ask? You’re in the right place. In this series of articles, we’ll look at the very basics of fraud, how it affects businesses, and how to protect yourself with the latest solutions.

What is Online Gambling Fraud?

Gambling fraud sees cybercriminals look to abuse or defraud an online casino/bookmaker with no direct involvement from the match itself.

Match-fixing is your typical scenario of one part of the competition &#;throwing a bunk&#; whereas gambling fraud is the concept of exploiting one aspect of the operator&#;s business.

Most Common Types of Online Gambling Fraud

While fraudsters tirelessly come up with new creative ways to exploit the system, there are a number of common attacks to watch out for.

  • Multiple account fraud: this is the cornerstone upon which many gambling attacks are built. Fraudsters create dozens or hundreds of accounts using fake credentials in order to tilt the balance in their favor online. For instance, they could use it for:
  • Bonus abuse: Whereby the numerous fake accounts benefit from new signup bonuses, coupons and other attractive offers. While these promos are an excellent way to attract new players, they can quickly make your platform run at a loss if you hand out too many of them.
  • Gnoming: once again using multiple accounts to help one player win. The other accounts are used to lose deliberately so one can pocket all the wins and bonuses that go with it.
  • Chip dumping: this is a practice found at the poker table. Like with gnoming, the idea is to make multiple accounts join the same table in order to cheat the system and influence the results in favor or against one particular player.

Then, there are the payment attacks. Online casinos and gambling platforms are essentially digital wallets, so processing payment means potential for losses there too.

  • Stolen credit cards: fraudsters can use stolen card information to top up their account, which means using illegitimate money to pocket real wins.
  • Chargebacks: this happens after the fraudsters have already topped their account. They then request a chargeback from their banking or credit card provider, which means getting refunded at the online gambling provider’s expense.
  • Phone top up abuse: if your online casino offers phone top up, fraudsters now have sophisticated ways of topping up their client. They call burner phone holders, and trick them into topping up their balance, which actually goes to fund their gambling accounts.

Finally, like with real brick-and-mortar casinos, owners have to watch out that they do not become a place of choice for money launderers. Any place that processes large amounts of money can be used to make illegally obtained cash legitimate, and gambling institutions are a choice destination for criminals.

Trying to Detect Gambling Fraud?

SEON offers a complete set of fraud fighting tools and dedicated team to help you find things like affiliate fraud, bonus abuse and much more!

Book a Demo

How to Prevent Online Gambling Fraud

One of the most important processes for any kind of online business is to follow a good KYC practice (Know Your Customer). This will involve a number of steps including the very basics during the user registration:

  • ID verification (depending on the local legislation)
  • Age verification (an important legal requirement that is a must)
  • PEP check (Politically Exposed Person) &#; a title typically relating to individuals with a prominent public personality such as heads of state, ambassadors, high ranking military officers and more…

During signup, you can still continue monitoring data using the following methods:

  • Device fingerprinting &#; finding information about the device used, as some of them will instantly point to suspicious usage.
  • Email analysis &#; emails are often linked to social media accounts, which makes it easy to track fake accounts.
  • IP analysis &#; similar to device fingerprinting, an IP address can reveal a lot about an individual’s internet usage, location, and potential for fraudulent activity.

Some of these steps can also be used at login, to ensure that the right user is using the right account. Device fingerprinting and IP analysis can also help flag account takeovers (whether credentials have been stolen or acquired through phishing attacks).

Finally, during account top-ups, it’s important to monitor the credit card information to ensure it hasn’t been stolen or doesn’t pose a high-risk threat.

process to prevent online gambling fraud step by step

Which Third Parties Do You Need to Use?

If you want to fight against Internet Gambling Fraud, you should know that Cross Referencing huge amounts of data are humanly impossible, which is why fraud managers will need to turn to third-party solutions. These will include:

  • ID verification provider
  • Politically exposed person list provider
  • Anti Money Laundering regulators (AML)
  • Sign up monitoring
  • Log in monitoring
  • Withdrawal and deposit monitoring
  • Actual games and tables monitoring

Why Internet Gambling Platforms are at Increasing Risk of Fraud?

As technology continues to improve and the pandemic forcing more players online, fraudsters are finding more ways to find loopholes within bookies operations due to the high-risk nature of the industry.

The online gaming industry has unique challenges with the difficult position of finding the balance between acquiring new punters and managing risk.

The Rise of Online Gambling

As the internet gambling market continues its meteoric rise, operators become increasingly high targets. Today, we’ll see what kind of challenges they face, and how to protect their business in the long run.

It&#;s predicted that by the end of the iGaming industry will generate a global revenue rate of $ billion with major markets such as the US, Germany, and Spain all recently legalizing online gambling.

The Explosion of Internet Gambling Fraud

Gambling is inherently risky. It’s part of the thrill but for online gambling operators, this risk takes a different form than for its players. It’s to do with fraud and the number of ways in which nefarious individuals can exploit loopholes in their platform.

Gambling Fraud vs Gambling Scams

Online gambling fraud sees the fraudster look to abuse a promotional abuse through multi-accounting or use stolen credit cards/IDs whereas online gambling scams see the perpetrator actually involve themselves with the game instead and look to camouflage themselves as an honest punter.

Fraudsters will look to abuse and leave as soon as they make funds, however, active players will participate in scams to &#;beat the bookie&#; and continue playing for as long as they can get away with it.

Scams can also be devised from the operator themselves through rigged betting/games that are set up to have zero chance of winning them.

Key Takeaways for Online Gambling Fraud

Gambling operators and online casinos do not face an easy task when it comes to monitoring and preventing fraud. Since they essentially operate as digital wallets, they will run into numerous risk factors, which requires sophisticated tools to analyze and flag data.

However, like numerous other industries, implementing even a basic solution could be a huge boon. For instance, it will help them prevent loss of income from chargebacks, which can help increase their bottom line.

More importantly, their business relies on user trust and building relationships with the players. If they do not believe the platform is safe or fair, they have enough competitors to turn to. Which is why preventing fraud and showing players that you are working for them can only have positive consequences on your business in the long term.

Still not sure if we&#;re the right fit?

SEON is more than just a software solution, we&#;re your partner in reducing bonus abuse!

Book a Demo

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the consequences of gambling chargebacks?

Since iGaming operators are categorized as high-risk, a high chargeback rate will ultimately impact an operator&#;s overall revenue and damage their ability to accept credit card payments.

Has anyone been prosecuted for internet gambling fraud?

Numerous instances of gambling fraud have led to huge fines and even jail time. For instance, in June , a nun in America was sentenced for embezzling more than $, from a school to pay for personal expenses which included gambling trips.

How big a problem is identity theft for online gambling?

Identity theft fraud is one of the biggest issues with iGaming as fraudsters look to use stolen identities for bonus abuse, open new accounts and ultimately launder money.

How do I know if someone used my card for online gambling?

One obvious sign is to check if you have any unauthorized transactions on your bank statement. Also looking at your recent gambling history for any behavior you don&#;t recognize or if there&#;s an increase in communication from your chosen operator can be two other signifiers.

You might also be interested in reading about:

Learn more about:

Data Enrichment 

One of the biggest challenges facing operators in the gambling industry is the degree of vertical integration. Every operator has to decide where to set the boundaries of its operations or, in other words, in which vertical stages of the gambling value chain will it compete. One portion of the operators is exclusively involved in providing gambling, betting, virtual and number games (or some subset of these products) through on-line and land-based channels, while everything outside of this scope is being outsourced. Other operators decide to integrate backwards along the value chain in order to internalize the development and maintenance of a proprietary technology platform, which is essential for the operations, as well as for the products and services provided to the customers. In this way, operators are mitigating the risks inherent to the supplier-byer relations in the open market, but stepping into other business risks associated to the development and running a platform, platform maintenance, etc. (not to mention the accompanying capital costs and time needed for this endeavor).

In essence, this challenge comes to decision on where the line will be drawn. So, what factors influence the decision on where will the boundary be set in terms of the scope of operator’s operations? How does the management decide which part of the business to outsource and which part should remain inside its scope of operations? In general, any outsourcing decision should be primarily based upon transaction costs analysis and resource/capability review.

Transaction costs are the costs of making an exchange of a product or service. This exchange can be external or internal. An external exchange occurs between two or more companies, generating the costs of sourcing the supplier, negotiating the terms of transaction, creating and monitoring agreement, etc. These costs largely depend on the level of market imperfection. More market imperfection leads to higher transaction costs. On the other hand, if a company decides to make the product or provide the service within its boundaries, that is called internal exchange, and it includes costs such as planning, developing, organizing, staffing, coordinating, controlling, etc. Internal transaction costs are directly related to the level of organizational complexity. More complex organizations have taller hierarchies, more organizational units and, therefore, more dispersed authority. In order to be controllable, more complex organizations require stronger integrating mechanisms, which are more expensive. To sum up, higher external transaction costs lead to internalization, while higher internal transaction costs result in outsourcing.

When it comes to resources and capabilities, it is of the utmost importance to make a clear conceptual distinction between these two terms. Resources are seen as tangible and intangible assets which are tied semi-permanently to the organization (Wernefelt, ), while capabilities are focused on the combination and linking of resources, i.e., they represent a distinctive and superior way of allocating resources (Schreyögg & Kliesch-Eberl, ). One of the most sustainable competitive advantages stems from the possession of the unique and valuable resources, and the specific manner in which a company combines and uses them (Prahalad & Hamel, ). Therefore, if resources and capabilities comprise the strategic advantage of a company, they will remain internalized. Otherwise, the decision on outsourcing should be considered.

After reviewing the most influential factors of the outsourcing decision, it is important to take a look at the challenges facing those operators that decide to take the harder strategic choice, at least in the short-run – those opting for internalizing the development and maintenance of a proprietary platform. These challenges are structured according to the Galbraith’s Star Model (Kates & Galbraith, ) that encompasses capabilities, structures, integrating mechanisms/processes, performance and reward systems, and people practices.

Capabilities. Having a proprietary platform development within a gambling operator company means having two completely different organizations in one company. These two organizations require different capabilities that will ensure each of them is viable and running: IT organization must possess capabilities related to the IT operations, software development, quality assurance, etc., while gambling operator organization must focus on acquiring and understanding events and markets, bookmaking, risk management, etc. Besides these core capabilities inherent to the existing of both organizations, a more strategic capability is needed – successful integration of an IT organization and gambling operator into one company requires the ability to balance between protecting innovative and agile ventures in the IT organization from the core business of the gambling operator, and finding the right linkages to leverage the overall business by creating synergistic effect.

Structure. Having an IT organization and a gambling operator under the same roof will result in the development of a dual structure that will allow differentiating efforts to focus on either exploratory and innovative side of the IT organization or exploitative side of the gambling operations. This kind of structural differentiation protects ongoing operations in the gambling part of the company from interfering with processes and competencies being developed in the IT part of the company (cf. Jansen et al., ). It allows very different frames to coexist in the company, while not requiring different cognitive frames to coexist within individuals. The only frame integration that does occur within individuals is at the corporate level, where they need to engage different frames without the risk of creating operating inconsistencies (Gilbert, ). In other words, these differentiated autonomous parts of the company ought to be strategically integrated through a senior executive’s vision, while having limited tactical integration between themselves (Tushman & O’Reilly, ).

Integrating mechanisms/processes. Aforementioned structural differentiation in time leads to the creation of a deep and wide chasm between the IT organization and gambling operator. Since these two organizations are indispensable parts of a larger company and must cooperate tightly, the chasm must be bridged using strong integrating solutions. More specifically, the two organizations need to establish a supplier-client relationship, where an IT organization will be a designated supplier of the platform and other IT services to the gambling operator. Therefore, integration should be established through behavioral and social solutions, as well as carefully selected set of systems and processes that collectively define employees’ behavioral context. From the simple and less expensive to more complex and expensive integrating mechanisms, these solutions include: informal networks, teams, integrative roles, and matrix structures.

Performance and reward system. Performance and reward system should be designed in a manner that will support the alignment of individual and group behaviors and performance with the company’s goals. It needs to be designed in a way that will motivate all employees to take initiative and become active contributors to the company’s success. Even though an IT organization and a gambling operator represent two very different organizations, they are inextricably intertwined, which is why there should be some sort of a common-fate performance and reward system in place. This system needs to be one of the main tools in shaping the desired organizational culture that will pervade both IT organization and gambling operator, and unite them in their quest toward the achievement of the company’s goals.

People practices. People practices involve various policies related to selection, staffing, training, and development of employees that are established to help form the competencies and mind-sets necessary to carry out the company’s strategy. Like in other industries, it is of the utmost importance to recruit and select the most suitable candidates for each position in the company, no matter whether it is located in the gambling operations, IT organization, or some of the support processes. Of course, the special attention should be paid to the customer-facing positions, such as operator in the retail outlets and customer support specialist working on the digital channels. Comprehensive skills training for these two positions is a must. Also, people practices need to foster a high-level of mutual understanding and respect between employees working in an IT organization and a gambling operator.

Building a gambling company comprised of an IT organization and a gambling operator is a hard task to master. In order to become viable, these gambling companies must learn how to overcome the challenges of vertical integration by achieving superior performance both in more explorative and innovative activities within an IT organization, as well as in exploitative, on-going, day-to-day operations within a gambling operator part of the company.

Источник: [casinobet77.asia]

French casinos vs. Française des Jeux : the war for online gambling is declared

Publié le 17/04/ par Thibault Verbiest, Evelyn Heffermehl- vues

A fierce competition The Syndicat des Casinos Modernes, one of the main bodies representing the interest of the casino sector in France has recently lodged a complaint to the European Commission’s Directorate General for Competition against the French State and the Française des Jeux, on grounds of abuse of a dominant position (article 86 of…

A fierce competition

The Syndicat des Casinos Modernes, one of the main bodies representing the interest of the casino sector in France has recently lodged a complaint to the European Commission’s Directorate General for Competition against the French State and the Française des Jeux, on grounds of abuse of a dominant position (article 86 of the EC Treaty read in conjunction with article 82).

The French casino sector has been facing fierce competition for the recent past years from the local monopoly, the Française des Jeux, which, sincehas been solely authorized to offer online gambling services in France by virtue of its own internal rules and under authorization of the French State.

The French monopoly has been expanding its offer ever more, providing online casino-like games &#; with names such as “black jack” and “roulette”- in violation of the European Court of Justice requirement of “consistent gaming policy “ set out in the famous Gambelli ruling.

The French casino sector has been unsuccessfully lobbying the French authorities for years in order to obtain the right to offer its services on the internet, as its European and national counterparts are allowed to do.

The French casino legislation is indeed outdated and unfit for today’s virtual industry as it partly dates back to the beginning of the twentieth century.

Many serious studies have shown that the French casino industry’s growth has been slowing down compared to the growth registered by the Française des Jeux and by the online casino industry.

Recently, NetBet Casino 5 - 50 Free Spins French Prime Minister has been asked by the Syndicat des Casinos Modernes to annul national provisions granting the exclusive right to offer gambling services to the Française des Jeux.

A refusal by the French government could trigger a parallel national judicial action in front of the highest administrative court, the Conseil d’Etat, which is not unlikely to give right to the casino sector: in May the High Court had already expressed its concerns over the ever expanding offer of the Française des Jeuxby referring to the European Court of Justice case-law.

Six years after, with the Française des Jeux now holding an online exclusivity, the High Court should be showing even more concern than back then…

The legal basis

Article 86 of the EC Treaty prohibits Member States, in the case of public undertakings and undertakings to which Member States grant special or exclusive rights, to enact or maintain in force any measures contrary to the rules contained in the Treaty, in particular to those rules provided for in article 12 and articles 81 to 89.

The Française des Jeux, as a public undertaking in a monopoly situation (the French State holds a 72 % share in the company), undisputedly enjoys a dominant position on the offline lottery and sports betting market.

This allows it to abuse its dominant position on another market: the emerging and booming online gambling market, which encompasses all that the gambling industry can offer: lotteries, betting, casino games and much more.

The abuse consists of:

  1. the extension of the monopoly’s dominant position to the online market, under permission of the French authorities;
  2. the subsequent discrimination operated between casino operators established in the European Union and the Française des Jeux, despite the fact that they are both situated on the same market: the online gambling market
  3. eliminating or weakening competition on a neighboring market: the online gambling market;

Commission decisions and European Court of Justice case-law prohibit a firm enjoying a dominant position to discriminate in favor of its own activities on a neighboring market.

Moreover, other secondary law instruments, such as the Directive on competition in the markets for electronic communications networks and services provide that,

Member States shall take all measures necessary to ensure that any undertaking is entitled to provide electronic communications services or to establish, extend or provide electronic communications networks.

As the European Court of Justice has decided, Member States have a duty, under article 10 of the EC Treaty, to ensure the fulfillment of the obligations arising out of the Treaty and no to take any measures which could jeopardize the attainment of the objectives contained therein.

One of these objectives, stated in article 3 (g), is to ensure that competition in the internal market is not distorted.

The Commission has thus been asked by the Syndicat des Casinos Modernes to address all appropriate measures:

  1. On the one hand, to the French State, which grants the monopoly to the FDJ through legislation (article 17 of a Act);
  2. On the other hand to the FDJ, so that it puts an end to its abusive conduct by amending its internal rules.

The impact of the internet on market (re)definition: the gambling example

Traditionally, casino games and other games such as lotteries and betting &#; which are offered exclusively in France by the Française des Jeux &#; belong to different markets.

The French competition authority considers, on the basis of supply side substitution, that casino games, lotteries and sports betting are not interchangeable: for example, traditional lottery games are available throughout the French territory, whereas casino games are restricted to certain (thermal) regions.

The distinction between casinos and games offered by the Française des Jeux therefore rests on a geographical criteria which no longer makes sense when applied to the internet: its de facto cross-border character prevents it in its very nature to be restricted geographically since all games are now available through the same channel of distribution.

This explains why Community law and jurisprudence do not distinguish between different types of gambling services, but refer to “gambling activities which involve wagering a stake with pecuniary value” (eg, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry, Commission proposal for a directive on services in the internal market, e-commerce directive, Schindler, Zenatti, Gambelli rulings of the European Court of Justice).

A French Senate report from (the Trucy report) has pointed out that the evolution of the gambling sector is characterized by a certain number of convergences linked to an increasing competition and the use of modern technologies.

Indeed, online gambling operators converge ever more towards a “one-stop-shop”, to quote the expression used in a comprehensive study conducted by the Deutsch Bank on the online gambling industry: to put it simply, today, online bookmakers offer classical sports betting services as well as casino games (and more).

This fact is even confirmed by the European Lotteries Association, which represents all the national lotteries in Europe.

When considering the demand- side substitution – which is the traditional criteria used by the European Commission for the sake of market definition &#;it is striking to see that players now have access on the Française des Jeux website, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry, to games ranging from lotteries to casino games, switching easily from one to another.

Other factors such as online payment and registering, games rules and names, visual presentation, wagers, profit, element of chance all point out to the fact that the games offered online are interchangeable in the eyes of the consumer. If players are wagering smaller amounts of money than offline, the addiction risks are the same whether playing a Française des Jeux lottery or a Casino-on-net game.

What next?

It is high time for the French authorities to acknowledge that the situation faced today by casino operators confronted to the French market is one that distorts competition and harms the achievement of the internal market.

This acknowledgment would be best shown by abrogating the relevant provisions of the Act which grants a monopoly to the Française des Jeux and/or by amending its internal rules whereby it is exclusively allowed to offer online gambling services to French citizens.

Alternatively, the French government should allow an online casino licensing regime available to all “fit and proper” operators.

If both the French State and the Française des Jeux fail to act, the European Commission would fully play its role of guardian of the Treaty by investigating the complaint lodged by the Syndicat des Casinos Modernes.

Droit & Technologies
Источник: [casinobet77.asia]
) and most are large effects (> City stays off EU tax haven MobileWins Casino 15 Free Spins. Macau Business. 13 March Retrieved 22 January
  • ^ abcdefg"Internet Gambling Developments in International Jurisdictions: Insights for Indian Nations"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 24 March Retrieved 19 March
  • ^"Size of the online gambling market from to (in billion U.S. dollars)". casinobet77.asia. Statista. Retrieved 6 September
  • ^"Online gambling statistics /"(PDF). Archived from the original(PDF) on 10 November Retrieved 14 March
  • ^ abChristensen, Darren R.; Dowling, Nicki A.; Jackson, Alun C.; Thomas, Shane A. (1 December ). "Gambling Participation and Problem Gambling Severity in a Stratified Random Survey: Findings from the Second Social and Economic Impact Study of Gambling in Tasmania". Journal of Gambling Studies. 31 (4): – doi/s hdl/ ISSN&#; PMID&#; S2CID&#;
  • ^"Our UK National Lottery Operation". Camelot Group. Retrieved 21 March
  • ^Bowcott, Owen (30 April ). "Rebranding of 'tired Lottery aims to halt slide in ticket sales". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 21 March
  • ^"15 USC Ch. INTERSTATE HORSERACING". United States House of Representatives. Retrieved 5 July
  • ^"Online Wagering Under Attack in Congress". Quad-Cities Online. Associated Press. 11 July Retrieved 10 November
  • ^"In-play betting is biggest growth area in sports gambling". Reuters. 17 January Retrieved 22 March
  • ^United States General Accounting Office—"Internet Gambling: An Overview of the Issues", Decemberp. 28, PDF file
  • ^"Rethinking the Offshore: Antigua's Internet Gambling Challenge". casinobet77.asia Retrieved 26 November
  • ^"United States — Measures Affecting the Cross-Border Supply of Gambling and Betting Services". World Trade Organization. 25 April Retrieved 5 July
  • ^"WTO ruling". casinobet77.asia Retrieved 26 November
  • ^"Reuters: WTO confirms U.S. loss in Internet gambling case". casinobet77.asia 30 March Retrieved 26 November
  • ^"Antigua demands trade sanctions". BBC. 20 June Retrieved 26 November
  • ^"Avast, me hearties! Antigua to legally pirate US copyrighted works". Networkworld. IDG. 25 October Retrieved 13 April
  • ^"Antigua and Barbuda: The new Pirate Bay?". Infoworld. IDG. 28 October Retrieved 13 April
  • ^"The Use of the Internet for Gaming"(PDF). Retrieved 9 April
  • ^Crowne-Mohammed, Emir Aly; Roy, Sanjay (19 May ). "Maintaining Provincial Monopolies: The Legality of Online Gambling Sites in Canada". Canadian Gaming Lawyer Magazine. 3 (1): 8– SSRN&#;
  • ^"About casinobet77.asia". Retrieved 10 April
  • ^Smith, Garry. "Sports Betting in Canada"(PDF). p.&#; Archived from the original(PDF) on 13 April Retrieved 9 April
  • ^Peppin, Joan. "Manitoba to Launch Online Gambling". Retrieved 9 April
  • ^"Quebec plan to block gambling sites draws cries of censorship". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 19 March
  • ^Cunningham, John A.; Cordingley, Joanne; Hodgins, David C.; Toneatto, Tony (1 December ). "Beliefs about gambling problems and recovery: results from a general population telephone survey". Journal of Gambling Studies. 27 (4): – Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry. ISSN&#; PMID&#; S2CID&#;
  • ^"French gambling plan seeks to stem illegal betting". International Herald Tribune. 31 December Retrieved 26 November
  • ^Pfanner, Eric (5 January ). "EU moves toward ruling on German gambling law". NYTimes. Retrieved 26 November
  • ^"German State passes online gambling legislation". Casinoadvisor. 14 September Retrieved 26 November
  • ^"Supreme Court Seeks Centre's Response On Online Rummy And Card Games In India - Ground Report". casinobet77.asia. 19 September
  • ^"Centre: Let SC decide if rummy, poker are gambling". The Indian Express. 26 September Retrieved 9 September
  • ^"Online Rummy And Online Poker Remains Legally Risky In India - Ground Report". casinobet77.asia. 13 September
  • ^"SC clears air, online rummy not gambling". 13 August
  • ^Clarification on Tax Compliance for Undisclosed Foreign Income and Assets
  • ^"Internet Law: The Israeli Police Orders Gambling Websites to Shut Down". casinobet77.asia Retrieved 26 November
  • ^"The Marker: Backgammon Site Play65 Returns its Activity in Israel". casinobet77.asia 20 May Retrieved 26 November
  • ^"Russian federal law "On state regulation of organization and management of gambling and changes to related legislation" ch.5". casinobet77.asia (in Russian). 29 December
  • ^Lim Yan Liang (9 September ). "Bill tabled to restrict online gambling in S'pore". AsiaOne, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry. The Straits Times. Retrieved 2 March
  • ^"Supper with Denise Phua". If Only Singaporeans Stopped to Think. 26 January Retrieved 8 October
  • ^"Update: Fire in gambling hall kills nine people in Dnipropetrovsk". KyivPost. 7 May
  • ^"On Prohibition of Gambling " casinobet77.asia
  • ^"We need a strategy: How can Ukraine legalize gambling business?".
  • ^"Over illegal gambling halls shut down as Ukraine prepares to legalize gambling". casinobet77.asia. Retrieved 19 December
  • ^"Ukraine Votes and Approves Gambling Industry, Prepares to Launch Officially". Gambling News. 21 January Retrieved 24 January
  • ^Online casinos legalized in Belarus from April 1

    Content marketing for the digital gambling industry, bookmakers and online casinos

    Why is the text so crucial for casino and gambling content?

    While casinos used to be exclusive meeting places in health resorts, where wealthy heirs and Russian writers squandered their fortune at the roulette table, the tide has turned significantly in recent years. Today, online betting offices and virtual gambling halls are booming.

    Accordingly, the content marketing strategy should be carefully planned. With honest content about gambling and casino games, you show responsibility, authenticity and create trust among users. You also provide information about secure payment options, your licence and, of course, lots of gaming fun. With gambling content that is perfectly tailored to the needs and requirements of your target group, you can also distinguish yourself from your competitors or dubious providers and make it easy for your site to be found by search engines through the skilful use of SEO.

    cards gambling casino

    Professional gambling content - the perfect strategy for your online casino

    In order to be successful in the fiercely competitive market, you have to convince with top content. With interesting articles, you will not only succeed in attracting new target groups to the virtual gambling Arctic Spins No Deposit Bonus Codes, but also in securing the loyalty and fidelity of your registered customers in the long Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry addition to exciting and informative texts, which are of course optimised for search engines, you can upload further elements such as graphics, pictures and videos and thus increase your visibility on the net. Position #0 on Google and Co is the goal. This total package makes your web presence at least as glamorous as the analogue look of the famous gambling establishments in Baden-Baden or Las Vegas.

    Who writes the texts about gambling?

    Content creation agencies like greatcontent have access to copywriters, editors and translators who find the right words for your virtual Las Vegas. Especially those linguists who like to gamble themselves are predestined to write appealing texts for the online gambling industry. The combination of SEO knowledge, passion for the written word and enthusiasm for the topic makes casino content perfectly tailored for online marketing.

    International gambling content for globally successful companies

    Most online casinos do not only want to establish themselves on the national market, but conquer the whole world with their online games. Accordingly, the web presence must also be internationalised. Be it the game instructions, the FAQ section or the blog - with multilingual texts you reach the communities on all continents and present yourself as the market leader in online gaming.

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) and your casino texts

    Sooner or later, many virtual casino operators are faced with the question of how to save money on multilingual content creation. After all, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry, there are countless free translation programmes. However, real flesh-and-blood language experts are essential to turn a mere computer translation into a correct and appealing text. At greatcontent we have perfected this process and produce fast and scalable translations in JV Spin Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes 30 languages. After the initial copywriting, if desired, the text goes through a CAT tool, (Computer Aided Translation), which is based on AI and delivers even better translations each time. This raw version is then revised by a post-editor and transformed into an easy to Beem Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes version that is optimally adapted to your wishes. Alternatively, there are the options of classical translation, localisation or a transcreation, where your text is written exclusively for the respective target market.

    What is the difference between translation and localisation?

    While a translation describes the transfer of the respective gambling content into the target language, localisation is another means of optimisation. The focus here is on regional peculiarities, cultural conventions and linguistic habits. This includes certain expressions, metaphors or idioms that are considered customary in a particular context and are not amenable to direct translation into another language.

    Increasing visibility with customised content for gambling and casinos

    It is well known that the virtual gambling market is a highly competitive industry. To combat this, a sophisticated strategy around the content in the gambling and casino market is a real must in order to increase its visibility and attract new customers.

    Whereas in the past the most important goal of a good text for casino & co was to catch customers on Google and other search engines, today the building of trust and the provision of real added value has Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry much more important. This is the only way to turn visitors who stumble across your website by chance into loyal customers who not only like to come back, but also recommend you to their friends.

    Your own image depend decisively on the content you publish. Texts without character that have already been seen times no longer have the potential to inspire. Great posts not only manage to answer the most important questions of the target group, but also to keep users on your website for a longer period of time. And a higher time-on-site is in turn rewarded by Google with a higher ranking. Because that is proof that your content really answers the readers' questions.

    How to build trust with epic gambling content

    A study by the renowned Washington University in St. Louis Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry that the online gambling market competes for billion users each year. Given that figure, it is of course not surprising that there are some rogue traders roaming around the gambling market. In order to set yourself apart from these dodgy characters, it is not only necessary to comply with all legal requirements, but also to show customers that you work transparently, honestly and professionally.

    With serious gambling and casino content you can establish yourself as a champion on the web. An exhaustive FAQ area is just as much a part of this as is responsible customer service that can be reached 24/7.

    How do visitors become regular customers of online gambling?

    In order to move to the Caesars Palace of the internet as quickly as possible, the first things to do is conquer the first page on Google with fantastic content on gambling and casinos. Unique texts on your casino, game instructions and payout options are a real must, because “duplicate content” is actively punished by the search engine.

    When users have found a way to your website, it is important to build trust, to entice them with exciting game offers Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry inspire with reliable payouts and competent customer service. Loyalty programs for regular gamers, bonuses for recruiting friends or other loyalty gifts do the rest and ensure that the passionate players come back regularly.

    Choose greatcontent as an experienced gambling expert!

    Join the ranks of other renowned players in the virtual gambling market who have chosen greatcontent as part of their marketing strategy, including Global Gaming, LAT Media, Mercury Interactive Services GmbH and Better Collective.

    Start now

    Источник: [casinobet77.asia]

    Isolating the impact of specific gambling activities and modes on problem gambling and psychological distress in internet gamblers

    • Research article
    • Open Access
    • Published:

    BMC Public Healthvolume 19, Article number:  () Cite this article

    • Accesses

    • 24 Citations

    • 12 Altmetric

    • Metrics details

    Abstract

    Background

    Gambling disorder is related to high overall gambling engagement; however specific activities and modalities are thought to have stronger relationships with gambling problems. This study aimed to isolate the relationship between specific gambling activities and modalities (Internet and venue/land-based) to gambling disorder and general psychological distress. Past-month Internet gamblers were the focus of this investigation because this modality may be associated with gambling disorders in a unique way that needs to be separated from overall gambling intensity.

    Methods

    Australians who had gambled online in the prior 30 days (N = , 57% male) were recruited through a market research company to complete an online survey measuring self-reported gambling participation, problem gambling severity, and psychological distress.

    Results

    When controlling for overall gambling frequency, problem gambling was significantly positively associated with the frequency of online and venue-based gambling using electronic gaming machines (EGMs) and venue-based sports betting. Psychological distress was uniquely associated with higher frequency of venue gambling using EGMs, Miami Club Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes betting, and casino card/table games.

    Conclusions

    This study advances our understanding of how specific gambling activities are associated with disordered gambling and psychological distress in users of Internet gambling services, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry. Our results suggest that among Internet gamblers, online and land-based EGMs are strongly associated with gambling disorder severity. High overall gambling engagement is an important predictor of gambling-related harms, nonetheless, venue-based EGMs, sports betting and casinos warrant specific attention to address gambling-related harms and psychological distress among gamblers.

    Peer Review reports

    Background

    Disordered and problem gambling represent important public health concerns and psychopathologies. The prevalence of gambling disorder is estimated at around 1% in various international jurisdictions [1,2,3,4,5,6]; however there is a significant impact of sub-clinical gambling problems experienced by a broader proportion of the population. These individuals are at-risk of developing more severe gambling problems, in addition to other mental health disorders [7, 8]. Gambling activities are diverse with markable differences between activities in terms of the mechanics, structural characteristics, and environment. For example, the same activity provided in venues or in online modalities may have unique characteristics that can lead to harms. The present study aims to isolate the unique relationship of specific gambling activities and modalities to problem gambling and psychological distress among Internet gamblers. This increased understanding of gambling disorder and psychological distress is essential in guiding treatment and prevention initiatives. This research will enable regulators and other stakeholders to optimise their efforts to counter gambling problems.

    Internet gambling

    Internet gambling (also referred to as online, interactive, or remote gambling, incorporating multiple Internet platforms and mobile devices) is no longer a newly emerging phenomenon, but a relatively well-established mode of accessing gambling globally. The legality of Internet gambling differs between jurisdictions with legislative variations ranging from prohibition or partial legalisation, to broad legal access [9, 10]. Many governments include considerations of harms related to Internet gambling in their legislative efforts. Nonetheless, research on the use of Internet gambling and its unique contribution to gambling-related problems is limited.

    Initial prevalence studies that included Internet gambling suggested that the rates of gambling problems are significantly higher in populations of online compared to land-based gamblers [2, 11,12,13,14,15]. However, when controlling for involvement in terms of frequency of participation, expenditure, and number of forms used (including land-based), Internet gambling participation does not uniquely predict gambling problems [2, 3, 16,17,18,19]. This is consistent with population prevalence studies which have not shown an increase in problem gambling prevalence, despite increases in Internet gambling participation [1, 2, 6]. For example, an analysis across 30 European jurisdictions did not identify any association between prohibitions against online gambling, gambling licensing systems, the extent of legal gambling opportunities and the prevalence of gambling disorder [5].

    Gambling activities and gambling modality

    Internet gambling does not represent a specific type of gambling activity, but rather a mode of access. Nonetheless, gambling activities have different features depending on whether they are accessed via Internet-connected devices or in venues, and different propensities and pathways that may contribute to the development of gambling disorders and problems (e.g., [20,21,22,23,24,25,26]). For example, venue-based gambling typically uses cash as compared to the credit cards and electronic funds transfers used in Internet gambling, which have been associated with greater expenditure [27, 28]. Social interactions may be limited to those also engaging in online gambling, rather than people who may decide to cease gambling and engage in other activities. That is, although the mechanics are Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry similar within gambling activities, the structural characteristics can be markedly different within the same activity in land-based as compared to Internet modalities.

    Isolating the impact of specific modes of gambling is critical as many problem gamblers engage in multiple gambling activities and focusing only on overall participation can lead to misleading interpretations. For example, in an Australian national telephone survey, the number of gambling activities used was predictive of increased gambling problem severity. When asked which mode of gambling made the greatest contribution to problems, 58% of those who had gambled online indicated land-based modes; % indicated that their problems had developed before they first gambled online [2].

    It is important to consider a potential interaction between the mode of gambling (i.e., Internet vs. land-based) and specific gambling activities in relation to gambling problems. In an Australian prevalence study, % of Internet gamblers experiencing problems reported using sports betting, while only % of land-based gamblers experiencing problems reported using sports betting [2]. Further, problem Internet gamblers were more likely to self-nominate sports or horse betting as causing their problems, in comparison to land-based problem gamblers who indicated EGMs as a causal activity [29]. Very few studies have examined the differences between gambling activities by modality in terms of their contribution to problems.

    The interpretation of previous findings is further complicated by the observation that many users of Internet gambling activities also gamble in venues. That is, someone who is considered an “Internet gambler” may not exclusively – or even preferentially – use online modes of access. Given the potential for complementary or compounding patterns of gambling behaviour (e.g., wagering online and in venues) [30, 31], it is necessary to examine the relationship between problem gambling, gambling activities, and gambling modalities.

    Due to finite resources, policy makers typically focus efforts to minimise gambling harms on specific activities. For example, electronic gaming machines (EGMs) are often highlighted as a specifically harmful gambling activity. These are often the most commonly reported form of gambling by individuals seeking help, and its participation associated with a greater likelihood of experiencing gambling problems [32,33,34,35]. It has been theorised and there is some research to support that features of EGMs may increase harm, including the rapid rate at which bets can be placed and results revealed, the variable reinforcement schedule, the ability to place large bets across multiple lines, and the audio and visual stimulation [33, 36, 37]. An analysis of 18 national prevalence studies indicated that EGMs, casino gambling, illegal gambling, and Internet gambling were consistently most strongly associated with gambling problems. Sports and horse race betting, and bingo were consistently moderately associated, while lottery type activities were consistently weakly associated [38, 39]. However, several recent studies have reported that overall gambling involvement is the most important factor in determining the risk of gambling problems, and that specific activities are not related to problems if overall involvement and intensity are statistically controlled for [3, 19, 40, 41]. These findings do not suggest that all forms of gambling are equally related to problems, but that involvement in multiple compared to single forms is a stronger predictor of gambling problems.

    Despite Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry above findings, many studies have used methodologies that make it difficult to isolate relevant factors including frequency of participation in each form and the mode of gambling access. First, several studies have measured Internet gambling as a discrete gambling activity, rather than a mode of accessing specific gambling activities (e.g., [15, 42], making it impossible to identify the impact of specific types of Internet gambling on problems. Second, studies have statistically controlled for involvement in multiple forms by using the sum of activities gambled on, while retaining the original or transformed activity measures in a regression model. This may produce biased results because of collinearity between the composite measure of involvement and the activity measures it is directly derived from [43]. This method of controlling for involvement also inherently controls for participation in individual activities, distorting and potentially supressing estimates of their impact on problem gambling.

    Problem gambling severity is an important factor to consider in establishing the impact of specific activities; however, overall psychological distress is also a critical consideration. Several studies have found that poor mental health and psychological distress are predictive of greater problem gambling severity [2, 44], Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry. One Australian study found that land-based problem gamblers reported greater psychological distress than Internet problem gamblers [29], suggesting that there may be covariates related to distress in addition to the experience of problems. Although gambling disorder is highly comorbid with other mental health disorders [4, 45, 46], most studies do not observe a direction of causality. Therefore, it is important to consider the unique relationship between psychological distress and participation in specific gambling activities, and specific modes of access.

    The present study

    This study aimed to investigate the relation of gambling frequency to problem gambling severity and psychological distress to understand the unique contribution of specific gambling activities to these mental health issues. Based on previous literature, we hypothesised that the frequency of involvement in a range of online and land-based gambling activities would be positively correlated with both problem gambling severity and psychological distress. Given the existing literature suggesting that EGM use is related Heavy Chips Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes gambling problems, a secondary hypothesis was that engagement in land-based and online EGMs would be positively related to problem gambling severity. We conducted multiple regressions exploring the unique relationship between participation frequency of each gambling activity by its modality (online and land-based) and 1) problem gambling severity, and 2) psychological distress, as well as investigating any demographic predictors.

    Methods

    Participants

    Participants were Australian Internet users, aged 18–85, self-reporting participation in online gambling at least once in the 30 days prior to completing the survey. The Australian gambling context includes partial legalization and prohibition; sports, esports, and race wagering is provided online through licensed domestic providers with all other forms of gambling prohibited online, however these are available through offshore providers [47]. Land-based venues are highly accessible and legally provide lottery products, EGMs, sports betting, race wagering, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry, poker, and casino card/table games.

    Potential participants were required to be age 18 years or older, be active Internet users, and have English comprehension. Participants were recruited from an existing database of potential research participants held by market research company Qualtrics. Overall panel and study response rates were not provided to the research team. The survey was completed between March 30 and April 5, After removal of participants completing the online survey twice, (%) participants were retained for further analysis (Table 1). All participants provided informed electronic consent. Ethics approval for the study was provided by the University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry.

    Full size table

    Measures

    The full survey included items for standard demographic details (e.g., age, gender, household income), online and land-based gambling behaviours, attitudes towards online gambling sites, motivations for engaging in online gambling, problem gambling severity, and psychological harms. Previous papers from this dataset have focused on the use of eSports as a newly introduced form of gambling in Australia [48, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry, 49]. The present exploratory analyses made use of demographic measures, measures of online and venue gambling activity frequency, problem gambling severity, and psychological distress. Analyses were limited to these variables because other survey items (e.g., perceived advantages and disadvantages of gambling sites with or without an Australian license) were designed to answer a different set of research questions than those addressed in the present manuscript.

    Online gambling frequency

    Participants were asked to indicate how often in the preceding 4 weeks they had gambled online for real money on each of the following activity types: lottery-type, EGMs, sports betting, eSports betting, race wagering, poker, casino card/table games, and other. For each activity type, participants were able to indicate if they have gambled 21.com Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes that activity: “not in the past four weeks” (1), “at least once in the past 4 weeks” (2), “at least once per week” (3), or “at least once per day” (4). An ordinal coding scheme was used for all online gambling activity frequency variables.

    Venue gambling frequency

    Participants were asked to indicate how often in the preceding 4 weeks they had gambled in venues for real money on the following activity types: lottery-type, EGMs, sports betting, eSports betting, race wagering, poker, casino card/table games, and other. Response were made using the same format as for the online gambling frequency described above.

    Problem gambling severity index

    The Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI) was used to measure problem gambling severity [50], Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry. In the present study, we used the sum score as a count measure of problem gambling severity [2, 16, 51], rather than using the classification categories used Comix Casino 100% First Deposit other studies. Several factors motivated our choice to treat the PGSI as a count variable. First, there is considerable debate regarding how low-risk and high-risk categories of the PGSI should be interpreted or scored [52, 53]. Second, the relationship between dependent variables and each level of the canonical PGSI were observed to be non-linear and violated a critical assumption of ordinal logistic regression models. Third, while a binary logistic regression could be applied to these data, the dichotomization of variables had received considerable criticism, and may produce biased results [54, 55]. The internal reliability of the PGSI was extremely good (α = ).

    To aid in comparison with other studies, we also calculated the proportion of participants classified into each PGSI group. % (n = ) of the sample were classified as non-problem gamblers, % (n = ) as low-risk gamblers, % (n = ) as moderate-risk gamblers, and % (n = ) as problem gamblers. We note that it is similar to the rates reported by other studies using online panels [56].

    Kessler psychological distress scale

    The Kessler 6 (K6) is a six item self-report scale intended to measure the level of non-specific psychological distress experienced in the preceding 4 weeks, and covers symptoms such as nervousness, feelings of worthlessness, hopelessness, and depression [57]. In addition to its brevity, the K6 has excellent internal reliability, and has been correlated with independent assessments of mental illness and psychological distress [58]. For each item, the following response options were available: “none of the time” (0), “a little of the time” (1), “some of the time” (2), “most of the time” (3) and “all of the time” (4). As with the PGSI, we calculated the sum of responses to each K6 item. The sum K6 score was then used as a count measure of psychological distress. The internal reliability of the K6 was extremely good (α = ).

    Breadth of online and venue involvement

    In keeping with past studies [41], we also calculated breadth variables for online and venue activities. Each of these composite count variables used the total number of activities that participants had engaged in at least once in the preceding 30 days. The total number of online activities could range from one to seven, and the total number of venue activities could range from zero to seven.

    Statistical analyses

    Data were analysed using R [59]. Relationships between the frequencies of participation in each activity were examined using Spearman’s Rho. Relationships between activity frequency, PGSI scores, and K6 scores were also examined using Spearman’s Rho. To facilitate interpretation of these correlations we report the median and 25th–75th percentiles of PGSI and K6 for each Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry of activity frequency. This reporting approach was used because of the non-normal distribution of PGSI and K6 scores, and the ordinal nature of the activity frequency variables. The Bonferroni method was used to correct for multiple comparisons when conducting these analyses. The unique contribution of each online or venue gambling activity and potentially related demographic details to PGSI and K6 scores were examined using Quasi-Poisson regressions. We used Quasi-Poisson regressions because of the extremely positively skewed and leptokurtic distributions of the PGSI and K6, and initial examinations which indicated that these variables were over-dispersed (e.g., their variance was greater than their mean). We used a recently developed variance-based method of calculating R2 to derive estimates of the variance accounted for by each regression [60]. These R2v values were calculated using the rsq package in R [61]. We report R2v values that have been adjusted for the number of predictors in each model (e.g., adj. R2v).

    We also examined whether multicollinearity was present between predictor variables using Variance Inflation Factors (VIF). The VIFs evaluated on models that included individual activity frequencies and non-categorical demographic variables (e.g., age) ranged between and (M = ), below the typical cut-offs of 5 or Variables with the highest VIFs included participation frequency for poker in venues (), eSports in venues (), eSports online (), poker online (), casino card/table games in venues (), and casino card/table games online (). All other VIFs were <  We also examined the VIF for models that included the breadth of involvement online or in venues. The VIF for the breadth of online () and venue () involvement exceeded recommended cut-offs and were therefore excluded from the regression models.

    In addition to the main regression analyses, we also performed a series of additional exploratory Quasi-Poisson regressions for each activity pair (e.g., online EGM and venue-based EGM). These analyses included the frequency of gambling on each activity pair, demographic variables, the breadth of involvement in online gambling, and the breadth of involvement in venue-based gambling. We summarize these results for these analyses in the main text, with the complete tables presented in the supplementary information. Relevant VIF scores for these analyses are presented in Additional file 1: Table S1 and the results of each regression are presented in Additional file 1: Tables S2-S

    Results

    The demographic characteristics of the sample are presented in Table 1. A majority of participants identified as male, European, were married or in a defacto relationship, had listed their highest level of education as post-secondary school, were working full- or part-time, were born in Australia, and did not speak a language other than English at home. Participants were aged between 18 and 85 years. PGSI scores were strongly skewed Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry, SveaCasino No Deposit Bonus Codes, Mdn = , Skew = , Kurtosis = , Min = 0, Max = 27), as were Kessler Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry scores (M = , SD = , Mdn = , Skew = , Kurtosis = , Min = 0, Max = 27).

    Gambling activity frequency

    The frequency of participation in each online and venue gambling activity is presented in Table 2. When aggregating across each level of frequency, % of participants had gambled online using lottery activities, % on sports betting, % race wagering, and % on EGMs. In terms of venue-based gambling, % of participants had gambled on lottery activities, % on sports betting, % on race wagering, and % on EGMs. For other activities available online and in venues, responses were skewed towards not having participated in the last 4 weeks (e.g., > = % had not participated).

    Full size table

    Associations between the frequencies of participation in each gambling activity were examined using a series of Spearman’s Rho correlations. As shown in Table 3, significant correlations were observed between most activities participated Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry online or in venues. Significant positive correlations were observed between online and venue participation frequency for the same activity pairs. That is, participants who frequently – or infrequently - gambled online using any particular activity (e.g., EGMs) were likely to also be frequently using – or infrequently using - that same activity type in venues.

    Full size table

    Significant positive correlations were also observed between different activities in the same modality of access (e.g., online poker and online casino card/table games), and between different activities in different access modalities (e.g., online eSports betting and venue casino card/table games). This consistent pattern of positive correlations suggests that the frequency of gambling – or not gambling – on any particular activity is reflected in other activities regardless of modality. However, two pairs of correlations differed from the pattern described above. Participation frequency in gambling using online lottery-type activities was not significantly correlated with the participation frequency for online sports betting, or with the participation frequency for online race wagering.

    Gambling Frequency & Problem Gambling Severity

    As shown in Table 4, PGSI scores were significantly and positively correlated with the frequency with which participants gambled online using lottery-type (rs() = , p < ), EGM (rs() = , p < ), sports betting (rs() = , p < ), eSports betting (rs() = , p < ), race Winolla Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes (rs() = , p < ), poker (rs() = , p < ), and casino card/table games (rs() = , p < ). PGSI scores were also significantly and positively correlated with the frequency with which these same participants gambled in venues using lottery-type (rs() = , p < ), EGM (rs() = , p < ), sports betting (rs() = , p < ), eSports betting (rs() = , p < ), race wagering (rs() = , p < ), poker (rs() = , p < ), and casino card/table games (rs() = , p < ).

    Full size table

    However, these analyses do not account for the overlap between the frequency of gambling using different activity types or modalities (e.g., those who frequently gamble on sports online also frequently gambled on sports in venues), making it difficult to determine if problem gambling severity is uniquely associated with the frequency of gambling using any single activity online or in venues. To identify which - if any - activities and modalities were uniquely associated with problem gambling severity, we performed a Quasi-Poisson regression using PGSI scores as the dependent variable (e.g., [16, 51]). Separate independent variables were included for the frequency of gambling on each activity type online or in venues. To control for potential demographic effects on PGSI scores, age, gender, relationship status, education, household income, work status, and ethnicity were also included in the model (Table 5). The model accounted for a modest amount of variance in PGSI scores (Adj. R2v = ).

    Full size table

    When controlling for all other variables, the frequency of online gambling using EGMs, venue gambling using EGMs, and venue gambling using sports betting each uniquely predicted greater PGSI scores. Demographic variables were also observed to be unique predictors of PGSI scores. Identification as South-East, East, or South Asian uniquely predicted greater PGSI scores, relative to identification as European. Conversely, an older age uniquely predicted smaller PGSI scores, as did being unwilling to report a household income, or reporting a household income of $25,–$49, $75,–$99, $,–$, and $,–$, relative to an income of less than $25, per year.

    Gambling frequency and psychological harms

    As with problem gambling severity, psychological distress was positively correlated with gambling frequency online and in venues (Table 6). Significant positive correlations were observed for online gambling on lottery type activities (rs() = , p < ), EGMs (rs() = , p < ), sports betting (rs() = , p < ), eSports betting (rs() = , p < ), poker (rs() = , p < ), and casino card/table games (rs() = , p < ), but not race wagering (rs() = , p = ). Psychological distress SportsandCasino.com 40 Free Spins also significantly positively correlated with the frequency of gambling in venues for lottery-type (rs() = , p < ), EGMs (rs() = , p < ), sports betting (rs() = , p < ), eSports betting (rs() = , p < ), race wagering (rs() = , p < ), poker (rs() = , p < ), and casino card/table games (rs() = , p < ).

    Full size table

    A Quasi-Poisson regression model was used to examine which activities uniquely predicted psychological distress. The same independent variables - including demographics - used in the PGSI model were used in the Kessler 6 model (Table 7). The model accounted for a small amount of variance in Kessler 6 scores (adj. R2v = ). When controlling for all other variables, higher frequencies of venue gambling using EGMs, sports betting, and casino card/table games were uniquely associated with increased psychological distress. Greater age was uniquely associated with decreased psychological distress. That is, older adults had less psychological distress than younger adults.

    Full size table

    Breadth of involvement, problem gambling severity, & psychological harms

    We examined whether the breadth of online or venue gambling was associated with PGSI and K6 scores. Participants engaged in between 1 to 7 activities online (Mdn = 2, 25th percentile = 1, 75th percentile = 4), and between 0 to 7 in venues (Mdn = 2, 25th percentile = 0, 75th percentile = 4). The breadth of online gambling was significantly positively correlated with the breadth of venue gambling (rs() = , p < ). Online (rs() = , p < ) and venue (rs() = , p < ) breadth were both significantly positively correlated with PGSI scores. Similarly, both online (rs() = , p < ) and venue (rs() = , p < ) breadth were both significantly positively correlated with K6 scores.

    As noted in the method, we performed a series of exploratory Quasi-Poisson regressions for each activity pair while statistically controlling for breadth of involvement in online- and venue-based gambling. The complete results of the Quasi-Poisson regressions for PGSI scores are presented in Additional file 1: Tables S2-S8 and the complete results of the Quasi-Poisson regressions for K6 scores are presented in Additional file 1: Tables S9-S In general, these regressions yielded a similar pattern of results as the main analyses and accounted for a similar proportion of variance in PGSI (Adj. R2v = –) and Kessler 6 (Adj. R2v = ) scores. The frequency of online and venue EGM gambling remained significant predictors of PGSI scores, even when controlling for breadth of gambling involvement, and each other. However, neither venue-based EGM play or venue-based casino card/table games were unique predictors of K6 scores. Venue-based sports betting was no longer a unique predictor of PGSI scores, or of K6 scores.

    The breadth of online gambling involvement or venues gambling involvement was generally associated with PGSI scores, but inconsistently associated with K6 scores. Both online and venue-based breadth of gambling involvement were positively associated with PGSI scores, except when controlling for online and venue-based EGM play, as shown in Additional file 1: Table S2. Associations between breadth of gambling and the K6 were inconsistent. Neither online or venue breadth of involvement were associated with K6 scores when controlling for EGM or casino game play. Venue – but not online – breadth was associated with K6 scores when controlling for lottery, eSports, and poker involvement. Conversely, online – but not venue – breadth predicted K6 scores when controlling for sports betting. Both online and venue breadth predicted K6 scores when only controlling for race wagering.

    Discussion

    In this study, we aimed to isolate the impact of specific gambling activities and modalities to advance our understanding of the relationship between gambling participation and problem gambling severity, and psychological distress. As anticipated, we found that frequency of participation in each gambling activity and modality was associated with greater problem gambling severity and psychological distress. When controlling for demographic variables and overlap between participation across activities, we found that the frequency of specific gambling activities and modalities were related to greater reported gambling problem severity and psychological distress in a sample of past-month internet gamblers. Critically, because the measures of gambling frequency included an option for non-participation, by controlling for each activity type we inherently controlled for breadth of participation.

    We found that those who engaged in an online version of a gambling activity were likely to have also engaged in the offline activity. This is consistent with previous research suggesting a positive and complementary relationship between online and offline gambling activity [62, 63]. Previous research on motivations for Internet gambling suggest that although convenience and accessibility are the predominant factors in choosing this channel, many Internet gamblers will still participate in offline gambling [30, 31]. Note, however, that we cannot speak to the causal direction of the relationship between online and offline gambling and future research should examine the temporal sequence of engagement with gambling activities and modes and development of problems. It is unclear whether engagement in an online activity may motivate the uptake of the offline variance or vice-verse – or if the two are not causally related at all, and our data are unable to speak to this question.

    Our results indicate that despite strong correlations between the frequency of play in each modality, specific activities online and in venues were uniquely associated with the severity of problem gambling or psychological distress. As hypothesised, the frequency of participation in EGM online and in venues uniquely predicted greater problem gambling severity scores, even when controlling for the frequency of gambling on other activities. This is consistent with previous research and theory suggesting a strong relationship between the use of EGMs and the experience of gambling-related problems [33,34,35]. Notably, our finding replicates and extends on previous observations that EGM use – particularly venue-based – is strongly associated with gambling problems even when controlling for the overall breadth of gambling involvement [32]. The finding that both online and venue-based EGMs were independently related to gambling problems suggests that there may be something about the game itself that is problematic, for example, the short interval between bets and outcomes enabling rapid, continuous periods of betting. However, the finding that only venue-based EGM participation was uniquely related to greater psychological distress suggests that there are differences between the modalities of access. Further research is needed to determine if there are differences between online and venue-based EGMs or various types of EGMs that may moderate the relation between frequent participation and the experience of gambling problems and psychological harms.

    Contrary to public debate surrounding online sports betting in Australia, participation in venue-based sports betting was uniquely associated with greater problem gambling severity scores and psychological distress, even when controlling for online sports betting. Given the additional effort needed to visit venues rather than placing sports bets online, Internet gamblers who also gamble in person may be more intensely involved in this activity. Our findings are contrary to previous Australian research that indicate that sports betting was associated with problems among Internet, but not land-based gamblers [2, 28]. However, these previous results were not specific in that the Internet gamblers with problems may have been using land-based venues for their sports betting. Further, our sample did not include exclusively land-based gamblers and this relationship should be investigated in a broader population of gamblers.

    Unique to this Best & Latest Online Casino Articles for 2022 | Top 10 Casinos is the finding that certain gambling activities were related to distress, but not gambling problems. Specifically, involvement in venue-based table and card games were uniquely associated with greater levels of psychological distress, but not problem gambling severity. Within the Australian context, casino and card games are only available from offshore gambling sites and land-based casinos; which are mostly limited to major Australian cities. The Pathways Model of problem gambling [20] presents emotional vulnerability as a Mr Vegas Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes factor for developing a gambling disorder and there is substantial evidence that psychological distress and mental health disorders, including anxiety and depression, are a risk factor for the experience of gambling problems [4, 45]. Individuals experiencing psychological distress may engage in gambling in an attempt to escape or negate these emotions [64]. Not all individuals who use gambling to cope with distress will develop gambling problems, and this may be moderated by the type of gambling they use. These findings may indicate that casino and card games have a lower potential to lead to problems, even among those psychologically vulnerable. Given the relatively limited availability, participation in casino-based gambling (excluding EGMs) is not often the focus of harm-minimisation efforts or campaigns. Although our cross-sectional results cannot indicate that those with higher rates of psychological distress are at risk of later developing gambling problems, they are still an important subgroup to consider in terms of SlotsRoom Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes to minimise harms. These findings should be replicated in a sample including non-Internet gamblers, as it may be that Internet gamblers have lower levels of interest in casino and card games in land-based venue or are less able to access these.

    Implications

    Our findings support the emphasis placed on EGMs as a predominant component in the experience of gambling problems in Australia, but also broaden the current focus to include online variants, only accessible through offshore gambling sites. The findings that more popular activities (e.g., lotteries) had a lower association with problems supports the association between greater overall gambling participation and harms. That is, those engaged in more specialised gambling may be more immersed in gambling as an activity. Public health policies may therefore target specialised gambling venues rather than the broad community to reach the most relevant cohorts. A broader range of gambling activities were uniquely related to psychological distress. In general, our results suggest that an increased focus on accurately identifying the cause, direction, and boundary conditions of these relationships is needed in empirical research.

    Additionally, our results confirm that there are at-risk subgroups within the population of Australian Internet gamblers. Specifically, younger adults were more likely to experience greater gambling problems and psychological distress. This is consistent with previous research finding younger age groups are at-risk of experiencing gambling problems [2, 42, 65, 66], but confirms that this is independent of participation in any specific activity, or overall gambling involvement. This suggests that there is something about younger age that is related to problematic gambling, potentially the increased propensity for risk taking and reduced awareness or consideration of potential negative consequences [67, 68]. However, it should be noted that our sample was more likely to include those aged 30 to 65; it is possible that there is a response bias and younger panel members may not be representative of young gamblers in general.

    Limitations

    As with any study there are important limitations to consider when interpreting the results. First, the data are Kudos Casino $10 No Deposit, and we cannot make any causal inferences. Our results cannot distinguish between participants who are experiencing gambling problems and/or psychological distress and are motivated to preferentially gamble using particular activities/use certain modalities, and participants who experience problems and/or distress because of their gambling using one activity or modality over another.

    Second, the sample is not representative of the broad population of gamblers. Participants self-selected from an existing panel held by a market research company and included only those who had gambled online in the past 30 days to focus on those who gamble online regularly. As participants received a small payment for participation, it is possible that false responses were made that were undetected. The panel provider did not disclose the response rate; future research using panels should ensure that market research companies are more transparent about data collection. It is possible that land-based (non-Internet) gamblers may have different patterns of gambling involvement which lead to harms that would not be detected in this research. Moreover, the results we report may be specific to the Australian regulatory context. As noted above, many of the online gambling activities evaluated in the present study were only accessible using offshore gambling operators. Previous research has found that Australian participants who used offshore gambling operators reported greater problem gambling severity and gambling involvement than those who used domestic operators [69]. Many participants in the present study may be drawn from a similar sub-group of Internet gamblers and Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry therefore unlikely to be representative of Australian internet gamblers, or gamblers in general. Due to the limitations of the Qualtrics platform, we are unable to calculate a response rate, and as such the sample may not be fully representative of even Australian Internet gamblers.

    Third, the current study used the PGSI as a measure of problem gambling severity. This measure has been criticised and may not accurately measure all gambling-related harms [70,71,72]. Unlike past studies we did not use the original [50] or alternative [52] cut-offs for the PGSI. We are therefore limited in the inferences we can make regarding the extent that specific activities and/or modalities uniquely predict membership to a specific PGSI category.

    Fourth, in the present study we used frequency of gambling as a proxy for involvement. This approach is coarse-grained, and overlooks the combined impact of frequency of gambling, expenditure on gambling, and disposable income on gambling problems and psychological distress. By conceptualising gambling involvement as the frequency of gambling, there is the possibility that different patterns of gambling behaviour – and their relationship with problem gambling and psychological distress – are obscured. For example, an individual with a large expenditure on sports once a month may be at more – or less – risk of developing gambling problems and psychological distress than an individual with a small expenditure on EGMs once per day. The dataset used in the present study only assessed expenditure on online activities, and not land-based activities, and as such we are unable to distinguish between these two quite different hypothetical patterns.

    Fifth, the fixed-response options used to measure frequency of gambling on each activity may introduce error to the reported estimates. While this ambiguity of response options and measurement is not limited to our study, it does limit the conclusions that can be made. The relationship between frequency of gambling on any given activity and PGSI/K6 scores could conceivably be stronger if intense but sporadic patterns of play are mistakenly measured as only being infrequent. The development of appropriate indices of self-reported gambling behaviour is difficult but will be necessary for accurate measurements when actual behavioural data is unavailable.

    Sixth, the presence of correlations between activity frequencies may have contributed to suppression of some regression coefficients. This potential collinearity is owing to intrinsic overlap between online and venue participation (or non-participation). That is, some level of collinearity is unavoidable because of multimodal patterns of play. For researchers interested in controlling for multimodal behaviour at the activity level, there are limited methods for satisfactory addressing this limitation. While the application of data-reduction methods such as PCA will reduce the number of variables to non-related components, this also has the Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry effect of clustering together activities that differ structurally - and potentially at a modality level - due to similarities in participant responses. Other approaches such as dropping variables are similarly limited.

    Future research may investigate the specific temporal relationships between gambling activities and modalities, such as whether there is a gateway effect between any activity and gambling problems. This may involve longitudinal research and should include samples that include non-Internet gamblers. Of interest from a policy standpoint is whether the availability of specific forms of gambling changes, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry, whether individuals migrate to alternate forms, or whether problems are reduced. It is important to note that associations between gambling activities and problem gambling severity are not necessarily fixed or stable over time. As changes are made to various forms of gambling, for example, changes to structural design and characteristics of play, this will likely impact the potential contribution of this form to the development of gambling problems. Similarly, the context in which gambling is available and presence of consumer protection resources may moderate this impact.

    Conclusion

    The current research provides an important contribution to the understanding of the relationship between gambling participation in specific forms and modalities and problem gambling severity and psychological distress in Australian Internet gamblers. The results replicate previous studies indicating that frequency of gambling involvement is related to greater gambling problems and psychological distress. However, when controlling for demographic factors and involvement in other gambling activities and modalities, only participation in land-based and online EGMs and land-based sports betting were uniquely predictive of greater gambling problems. Our results Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry that among pas-month Internet gamblers, participation in Internet gambling in general is not uniquely related to greater gambling problems, and that a continued focus on EGMS in their various forms and modalities, is important to reduce gambling-related harms.

    Availability of data and materials

    The dataset analysed in the current study is not publicly available, or available on reasonable request because participants explicitly consented to only have their data shared with the immediate research team.

    Abbreviations

    Electronic Gaming Machines

    Kessler 6

    Problem Gambling Severity Index

    Variance Inflation Factors

    References

    1. 1.

      Abbott M, Bellringer M, Garrett N, Mundy-McPherson S. New Zealand National gambling study: Overview and gambling participation. Wellington: AUT; [cited Feb 14]; Available from: casinobet77.asia

      Google Scholar

    2. 2.

      Gainsbury SM, Russell A, Hing N, Wood R, Lubman DI, Blaszczynski A. The prevalence and determinants of problem gambling in Australia: assessing the impact of interactive gambling and new technologies. Psychol Addict Behav. ;28(3)–

      PubMedArticlePubMed Central Google Scholar

    3. 3.

      LaPlante DA, Nelson SE, LaBrie RA, Shaffer HJ. Disordered gambling, type of gambling and gambling involvement in the British gambling prevalence survey Eur J Pub Health. ;21(4)–7.

      Article Google Scholar

    4. 4.

      Petry NM, Stinson FS, Grant BF. Comorbidity of DSM-IV pathological gambling and other psychiatric disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on alcohol and related conditions.[CME]. J Clin Psychiatry. ;66(5)–

      PubMedArticlePubMed Central Google Scholar

    5. 5.

      Planzer S, Gray HM, Shaffer HJ, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry. Associations between national gambling policies and disordered gambling prevalence rates within Europe. Int J Law Psychiatry. ;37(2)–

      PubMedArticlePubMed Central Google Scholar

    6. 6.

      Welte JW, Barnes GM, Tidwell M-CO, Hoffman JH, Wieczorek WF. Gambling and problem gambling in the United States: changes between and J Gambl Stud. ;31(3)–

      PubMedPubMed CentralArticle Google Scholar

    7. 7.

      Currie SR, Hodgins DC, Wang J, El-Guebaly N, Wynne H, Chen S. Risk of harm among gamblers in the general population as a function of level of participation in gambling activities. Addiction. ;(4)–

      PubMedArticlePubMed Central Google Scholar

    8. 8.

      Shannon K, Anjoul F, Blaszczynski A. Mapping the proportional distribution of gambling-related harms in a clinical and community sample. Int Gambl Stud. ;–

      Google Scholar

    9. 9.

      Gainsbury S, Wood R. Internet gambling policy in critical comparative perspective: the effectiveness of existing regulatory frameworks. Int Gambl Stud. ;11(3)–

      Article Google Scholar

    10. Wood RT, Williams RJ. Problem gambling on the internet: implications for internet gambling policy in North America. New Media Soc. ;9(3)–

      Article Google Scholar

    11. Griffiths M, Wardle H, Orford J, Sproston K, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry, Erens B. Internet gambling, health, smoking and alcohol use: findings from the British gambling prevalence survey. Int J Ment Health Addict. ;9(1):1–

      Article Google Scholar

    12. Kairouz S, Paradis C, Nadeau L. Are online gamblers more at risk than offline gamblers? Cyberpsychology Behav Soc Netw. ;15(3)–

      Article Google Scholar

    13. McCormack A, Shorter GW, Griffiths MD. An examination of participation in online gambling activities and the relationship with problem gambling. J Behav Addict. ;2(1)–

      PubMedArticle Google Scholar

    14. Svensson J, Romild U. Incidence of internet gambling in Sweden: results from the Swedish longitudinal gambling study. Int Gambl Stud, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry. ;11(3)–

      Article Google Scholar

    15. Wood RT, Williams RJ. A comparative profile of the internet gambler: demographic characteristics, game-play patterns, and problem gambling status. New Media Soc. ;13(7)–

      Article Google Scholar

    16. Baggio S, Dupuis M, Berchtold A, Spilka S, Simon O, Studer J. Is gambling involvement a confounding variable for the relationship between internet gambling and gambling problem severity? Comput Hum Behav. ;–

      Article Google Scholar

    17. Gainsbury S, Russell A, Hing N, Wood R, Blaszczynski A. The impact of internet gambling on gambling problems: a comparison of moderate-risk and problem internet and non-internet gamblers, Online Gambing Articles- Exclusive Analysis of the Online Gambling Industry. Psychol Addict Behav. ;27(4)–

      PubMedArticle

    Источник: [casinobet77.asia]
     Device Fingerprinting

  • 2 comments

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *